India : The Superstitions Country

India : The Superstitions Country

 

Superstition in India is considered a widespread social problem. Broadly defined, superstition is a belief in the supernatural, which is to say, a belief in the existence of forces or entities that do not conform to the laws of nature or a scientific understanding of the universe.

 

Superstitions and Beliefs

Superstition is a pejorative term for any belief or practice that is considered irrational: for example, if it arises from ignorance, a misunderstanding of science or causality, a positive belief in fate or magic, or fear of that which is unknown.

Examples of Superstitions in India:

  • Belief in magic.
  • Belief in divination.
  • While leaving home, seeing a widow or a barren woman is not lucky.
  • Belief in omens.
  • For fear of evil spirits, nails should not be cut in the night.
  • Belief in good luck charms.
  • Belief in astrology.
  • While leaving your house, hearing the shrill sound of a peacock is considered bad.
  • Belief in ghosts or a spirit world.
  • Sweeping the house at night is not good.
  • Witnessing an owl over the house-top is a sure sign of approaching ruin and destruction.

Breaking glass is a good luck

In our country India believed that if we break glass unintentionally, than a good luck is about to come.

Crow can bring guest to your house

We all get irritated by the crowing of the crow and we just not want any crow to come near our house but what if a crow gives us chance of Mehman-nawazi. 

 If a cat crossing your path

Cats are blamed just for being black (no racist joke here). It’s a popular belief in the west too that, if a black cat crosses your path, it’s a bad omen. For the west, the origin of this superstition came from Egypt.

Egyptian culture believed that black cats were evil creatures, whereas the Indian explanation is that black represents Shani and therefore brings bad luck. It is said that if a black cat crosses your path, then your day’s tasks get delayed or postponed.

Which reminds me, when we were kids and went for our exams, and if a black cat crossed, never once was the exam delayed or postponed.

Throwing coins in holy rivers

Throwing coins in fountains and other water bodies for good luck is now done all over the world. Again, there is a scientific reason for why this started. In ancient times, the coins were made of copper, which is an essential element for our body’s well being.

Rivers used to be the main source of drinking water. When the copper coins remained in the water for long, it became beneficial for those who drank it. Copper also helps to kill bacteria present in the water.

Good Luck in India Culture

  • When someone, who is going on a trip, sees a married lady with flowers on her head, and kum-kum on her forehead, it is believed that the trip will be successful.
  • If you see an elephant on your way to your destination, your purpose of going will be fruitful. It is believed that Lord Ganesh, the elephant God of Indian mythology, removes all the obstacles on the way.
  • Seeing a peacock on a journey is also considered lucky.
  • Eating sweet curd before an exam will bring good luck.
  • If a girl’s horoscope matches well with a boy’s horoscope, at the time of their marriage, then they will have a successful married life.
  • There is a strong belief in the power of dreams as divine warnings. Dreaming of gods, demons, auspicious animals, or any other auspicious thing is seen as good.
  • If somebody is leaving home for the day’s work and you sneeze thrice, it’s a bad omen.
  • Keeping footwear upside down brings fights between family members.
  • In some parts of the country, it is believed that Monday is not an auspicious day for shaving or cutting hair.
  • Tuesday is believed to be a bad day to reach anybody’s home from a journey.
  • Saturday is considered bad for purchasing metal or leather, as it brings bad luck in terms of financial prosperity.
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